Water treatment plants with BlueGoldWorks

Natural water treatment with BlueGoldWorks? The Moringa pods have three times the amount of Vitamin C of an Orange. Moringa is also one of a kind as its leaves are rich in essential amino acids which are unique in plants. Moringa is rich in protein and is a source of good cholesterol. It is used as a stimulant for milk production when breastfeeding and the leaves can be dried and made into a powder. Another way is to make a delicious tea. This Tea manages blood glucose level, stabilizes high blood pressure, and promote a good night sleep. The tea is used as an energy booster even though Moringa tea does not contain caffeine! Traditional medicine techniques use Moringa leaves to treat gastrointestinal problems, headache, inflammation, anaemia, fever, eye infection, bronchitis, poor nutrition, inner ear infections and skin infections.

Products from the Moringa tree are well known for their antioxidant, anti-aging and anti-bacterial qualities. Blue Gold Works provides African farmers with a market for source verified, organic Moringa oil and Moringa honey for export to high end cosmetics firms. By year 5, Blue Gold Works will return revenue of $9 million directly to the farmers. We also educate and support the farmers’ efforts to remain organic and improve the soil and environment. Farmers working with Blue Gold Works will have planted an additional 600 hectares of Moringa trees, sequestering 44 million pounds of CO2 per year. See even more information on Water treatment filters.

When I became a mother, I had an epiphany. Now and forever, I am linked in a chain of humanity responsible for creating a safer, healthier planet for the next generation. That is our legacy. Where, I asked myself, should I focus my efforts for the greatest impact? The provision of clean, safe, drinking water is today’s most complicated, most intractable global problem. Two billion people on our planet don’t have ready access to safe drinking water. In the developing world, sixty percent of deaths of children under the age of five are from waterborne illnesses. Girls endanger themselves walking hours every day fetching water, giving up their chance for education and diminishing their future earning power. Billions of dollars in International Aid has utterly failed to sustainably build and maintain water treatment plants or dig wells. Nations are already in conflict over diminishing water supplies. Poor health, little education, grinding poverty, strife. The cycle repeats.

Evan Bauer is a technology executive, architect, strategist, designer, engineer, and operator of mission-critical systems who is committed to service to the local and global community. He is a passionate advocate for open source software and open source business models. Evan is a 20-year volunteer with Habitat for Humanity NYC who served two terms on its board of directors and is a disaster recovery volunteer with the Amateur Radio Emergency Service. He has senior management experience with organizations of all types and sizes, ranging from startups to government agencies and global enterprises. Evan is the Founder and CEO of OpStack, delivering operations automation solutions for both the data center and the cloud. In his previous role, Evan served as Executive Director and Group Head for Technology Operations at KPMG, LLP. Other experience includes CTO of the Collaborative Software Initiative, CTO of Credit Suisse First Boston, and Principal Architect for Trading and Sales at Bankers Trust. His consulting clients have included JPMC, IBM, HP, Bank of Tokyo, and the Blackstone Group. Evan studied political science, finance, and statistics at Wesleyan University and the University of Pennsylvania.

The seeds can even be crushed and added to murky water to purify it, as it acts as a natural binder. This Binder either moves the undesired particles to the bottom or allows them to float to the surface. On the surface, it is easy to remove. It is only about 2 to 3 seeds per litre of water. The San people used the Moringa tree as a supply for water, especially in the desert regions of Southern Africa. They would make a small hole in the bottom of the tree trunk. Just big enough to fit in a piece of reed. After a while, the tree sap would start to flow. The san collected the watery liquid, in ostrich shells, it is quite bitter, but in time of no to very little water available, this was good enough to keep them going! They would then reseal the hole with a piece of clay made from the tree sap and some soil which prevents the tree from rotting and move on to their next destination. Read additional details on this website.

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