Tree services professional in Colorado Springs

Tree removal help in Colorado Springs: Do you want to keep your trees safe? First we will write some advices on tree care and after that we will introduce Tree Artisans, a tree services company in Colorado Springs. Not enough water is harmful for the tree, but too much water is bad as well. Over-watering is a common tree care mistake. Please note that moist is different than soggy, and you can judge this by feel. A damp soil that dries for a short period will allow adequate oxygen to permeate the soil. You can check soil moisture by using a garden trowel and inserting it into the ground to a depth of 2″, and then move the blade of the trowel back and forth to create a small narrow trench. Then use your finger to touch the soil. If it is moist to the touch, then they do not need water.

If your area constantly deals with drought you will want to consider trees listed as drought-tolerant. Some drought-tolerant species include Arizona Cypress, Japanese Zelkova, White Fir, and Kentucky Coffeetree. On the opposite side of the spectrum if your area deals with a large amount of moisture or wet conditions, here are a few trees that will do better in wet conditions: Baldcypress, Shellbark Hickory, Red Maple, Silver Maple, Paper Birch, River Birch, and Weeping Willow.

Trees are an important element to your backyard landscape. Not only do trees provide much-needed shade in our increasingly urban suburbia, but their lush, green foliage adds amazing aesthetics. But sometimes our common backyard trees can fall victim to unforeseeable natural threats, which can weaken and eventually kill them. Here, we’ll review the most common threats to trees and how you can protect your trees from damage. There are hundreds of different kinds of common diseases, pests and other natural threats that can affect your trees. Here are the most common.

Tree owners often need to move or transplant trees from a nursery or within the yard. Yard trees may have been planted too thickly or threaten to outgrow available space. Size is a critical factor in transplanting. The larger a tree, the more difficult it is to transplant. Before starting a mulching project, become familiar the critical root zone (CRZ) or tree protection zone. This zone is generally defined as the area under a tree and out to its dripline. Improving conditions in this protection zone will also result in major health benefits to a tree. While you won’t need to do much to keep your trees healthy, it makes sense to take some simple precautions to ensure they last a lifetime. Surrounding the base of your trees with mulch is a great idea. Mulch will protect the tree from over-watering and over-fertilizing. Layer the mulch 2 to 3 inches thick and keep it away from the bark of the tree. Make sure to remove the older mulch before putting on a new layer. Most trees don’t need much pruning, in fact, pruning can slow the growth because the tree must heal before it continues to grow. Good times to prune a tree are when you see dead limbs or those that have cracked because of strong wind or a rain storm. You should take the time to safely cut these limbs or branches away from the tree to prevent them from falling and possibly damaging your property. See extra information on Colorado Springs professionals in tree pruning.

As a tree ages, it becomes less able to adapt to major changes and is more susceptible to decline. The key to mature tree care is maintaining stable conditions, avoiding disturbances to the root system, and proper pruning to preserve structural integrity. Pruning of mature trees should be limited to dead branches. Foliage removal is recommended only when absolutely necessary. Soil management goals include: Simulate ideal conditions found in nature by mulching as far out to the drip-line as possible. Fertilize by prescription to correct nutrient deficiencies. Irrigate as needed to avoid drought stress.

Looking for the best options if you need to cut down the tree maintenance costs? Start with picking the right trees for Colorado! The Burr Oak is the largest tree on our list. It can grow to be 50 feet tall and wide. A “dreadnaught” indeed! Burr Oaks have a moderate growth rate. Their beautiful and substantial bark becomes deeply furrowed with age. They have dark green leaves with the typical oak leaf silhouette. The leaves turn a brownish yellow in the fall. They produce acorns every year. This tree is remarkably cold-tolerant, and will adapt to a wide range of soils.

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