MyTrendingStories suggests recommendations about scam avoidance right now

Mytrendingstories offers guides on protecting yourself from online scam? We are the world (The world of charity scams, that is): How it works: You get an email with an image of a malnourished orphan—from Haiti or another developing nation. “Please give what you can today,” goes the charity’s plea, followed by a request for cash. To speed relief efforts, the email recommends you send a Western Union wire transfer as well as detailed personal information—your address and your Social Security and checking account numbers. What’s really going on: The charity is a scam designed to harvest your cash and banking information. Nothing goes to helping disaster victims. The big picture: The Internet, email, and text messaging have given new life to age-old charity scams. “These cons watch the headlines very closely,” says Durst, and they quickly set up websites and PayPal accounts to take advantage of people’s kindness and sympathy. Durst recalls seeing fake donation websites within days of Michael Jackson’s death, urging fans to contribute to his favorite charities. Natural disasters, too, tend to spawn all sorts of fake charities.

News by MyTrendingStories online portal: Do not pay money—for anything. Legitimate employers don’t charge to hire you. Don’t pay for kits, software, training, or any other tools or procedures. Don’t send money for work-at-home directories, advice on getting hired, company information, or for anything else related to a job. References work both ways. You are as entitled to check a company’s references as they are to check you out. Ask for references if you’re not sure if the company is legitimate. Request a list of other employees or contractors. Then, contact the references to ask how this is working out. If the company isn’t willing to provide references (names, email addresses, and phone numbers), do not consider the opportunity.

MyTrendingStories anti-scam guides: Maybe you wouldn’t be frightened by this scam or that scam. People are getting better at recognizing the common scams and ignoring them. But scammers keep adapting and they specialize in pushing emotional buttons with just-credible-enough claims. One day a scam could “get to you.” It will be a situation where you’ll be afraid that what you’re being told could be true. The scammer will put tremendous pressure on you to act before you have time to think or control the adrenaline rush, just like the couple in Hingham. Take the opportunity now — as with a fire drill — to plan for how you and your family and friends will deal with an “alarming news” message threatening to lead to some “dreadful” potential outcome. Read additional details on https://mytrendingstories.com/korkrum-ellen-y-kawame/mytrendingstories-scam-guide-or-how-to-defeat-online-scammers-in-dztbwv.

Mytrendingstories teaches how to avoid scams: Melanie Duquesnel – the President and CEO of the Better Business Bureau, serving Eastern Michigan and the Upper Peninsula – recommends you only book flights on websites familiar to you. If you Google kiss&fly, the site pops up, but just below that, you find a slew of reviews warning you not to use it. So, what is the biggest scam the local BBB is seeing right now when it comes to travel? “The biggest scam is where you’re going to rent,” said Duquesnel. It’s called the Vacation Rental Con,where you’re lured into booking a house or a condo only to find out the property isn’t actually for rent, doesn’t exist, or is significantly different than what was pictured. Even reputable sites like Airbnb and Vrbo have had to deal with this problem according to Duquesnel.

Your bank will never email you asking for your PIN or password. If you get an email or text from your bank about fraud, ask yourself whether or not that’s the usual way you receive contact from your bank. Think about whether it’s sensible for the bank to make contact in that way. The British Bankers’ Association’s Know Fraud, No Fraud campaign highlights eight things your bank will never do, including calling or emailing to ask you for your full PIN or any passwords. Banks will also never send someone to your home to collect cash, bank cards etc. Get clued up with the full ‘Things your bank will never ask you to do’ list. Web viruses don’t just ruin your computer. They can help steal money or even use PCs to commit crime. Some even lie dormant, waiting to be activated – as was the plan with 2014’s Gameover Zeus virus. To help prevent viruses keep your web browser up to date and your PC backed up with free antivirus software. See our guide on Free Antivirus Software. Read more info on https://mytrendingstories.com/.

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