Chapter 13 lawsuits by bankruptcy attorney Houston

Dove law firm Houston, TX and chapter 7 guides: Discovery is a formal request for information and documents during the lawsuit process. If the case is pending in a justice of the peace court, court approval must be given prior to either side beginning the discovery process. If the case is pending in a county court or a district court, court approval is not needed. Typically, but not always, discovery must be concluded thirty days before the case is set for trial. If the ‘Plaintiff’ (the person or company doing the suing) believes that they have all the proof they need to win the lawsuit (and there are no disputed facts), they can file a writing with the court asking for a judgment to be entered. This writing is called a motion for summary judgment. If the ‘Defendant’ (person being sued) believes that the Plaintiff is absolutely lacking some of the proof required to win the lawsuit, the defendant can file a writing asking that the case be dismissed. This writing is called a no-evidence motion for summary judgment.

As a bankruptcy lawyer in Houston, I primarily help people and companies file Chapter 7 bankruptcy and Chapter 13 bankruptcy. I also help both individuals and companies resolve other debt issues. I have been practicing as a Chapter 7 lawyer in Houston and as a Chapter 13 lawyer in Houston for over 5 years. I think that customer help should be the number one priority in any business, but it is especially important in the bankruptcy and debt settlement field. When people are struggling financially they may be stressed, nervous and scared about their situation. The prompt returning of telephone calls and e-mails is important so as to help alleviate anxiety. You can also take comfort in knowing that you will be speaking with an attorney every time you call or come in for an appointment. Dove Law Firm, PLLC is a Debt Relief Agency. We help people file for bankruptcy relief under the Bankruptcy Code as well as resolve other debt issues.

Student loan interest paid by you or someone else: In the past, if parents or someone else paid back a student loan incurred by a student, no one got a tax break. To get a deduction, the law said that you had to be both liable for the debt and actually pay it yourself. But now there’s an exception. You may know that you might be eligible to take a deduction but even if someone else pays back the loan, the IRS treats it as though they gave you the money, and you then paid the debt. So, a student who’s not claimed as a dependent can qualify to deduct up to $2,500 of student loan interest paid by you or by someone else.

Your creditor could also object and keep certain debts from getting discharged. For example, a credit card company could object to the debt from recent luxury goods purchases or cash advances, and the court may decide you still need to repay this portion of the credit card’s balance. Additionally, a Chapter 7 bankruptcy may discharge the debt you owe on secured loans. Secured loans are those backed by collateral, such as your home for a mortgage, or when a creditor has a lien on your property. However, even if the debt is discharged, the creditor may still have the right to foreclose on or repossess your property.

Pick Up Capital Gains if You’re in a Low Tax Bracket: The end of the year is also a good time for some people to sell stocks that have appreciated significantly in value. This can be a particularly good strategy for those who are in the 10% and 12% tax brackets since their capital gains tax may be zero. The stocks can then be repurchased, which resets the basis and minimizes the amount of tax to be paid on future gains. Even if you’re not in the lowest tax brackets, you may want to sell winning stocks to reset the basis if you’re also harvesting losses. “What you want to do is balance (gains) with stocks that have losses,” Barlin says. See additional info on ryan dove bankruptcy lawyer.

Who Should File Chapter 13 Bankruptcy? Many people think of bankruptcy court as the final stop on a path to financial ruin, the only option left when repaying debts seems impossible. But there’s hope even in bankruptcy, and Chapter 13 of the federal bankruptcy code offers the closest thing to a soft landing. Sometimes called the Wage Earner’s Bankruptcy, Chapter 13 allows those with enough income to repay all or part of their debts an alternative to liquidation. It’s bankruptcy for those whose biggest problem is dealing with creditors’ demands for immediate payment, not lack of income.

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