Michael Jackson encyclopedia : songs, life and family

Michael Jackson top songs, career and his family now: Every song here has its flaws, though; after all, there’s a reason Jackson himself didn’t release ’em. That doesn’t mean there aren’t some things to take away. “(I Like) The Way You Love Me” works off this dreamy piano melody and some incredibly rich instrumentation that lets Jackson soar high. It’s probably the greatest highlight on the album and the one that feels the most natural, too. “Keep Your Head Up” should succeed in making you smile, sounding like one of Jackson’s ’90s classics. With a clean, sophisticated finish, Jackson finds himself swimming here, thanks to some pretty spot-on production work by Christopher Stewart. It’s easy listening, but done well. “Hollywood Tonight” could have used some tweaking to keep it from sounding like a Madonna tune (What were you thinking with that spoken word, Teddy Riley?), but regardless, it’s still a fast-paced spitter that’s decadently enviable.

Riley recruited Jackson’s favorite rapper Heavy D for four nimble bars, his baritone artfully offsetting the singer’s falsetto growl. The first song wastes no time in articulating the album’s leitmotif. Jackson urges the world to come together, decries false prophets crying of doom, and admits that the universe is a complicated place full of “tears for fears.” He’s “conditioned by the system” and doesn’t want to be preached to. His ultimate realization is that you have to “live each day like it’s the last,” find inner peace to stay strong against the haters, and when in doubt, jam. You can see these themes stressed on nearly every song. “Why You Wanna Trip on Me” exists as a mission statement. This is the Michael who fame has isolated and forced into retreat. There’s a newfound menace in his voice, an angelic sneer, as he recites a litany of crippling ailments (world hunger, illiteracy, disease, gangs, homelessness, drug addiction, corruption, police brutality)—and yet ironically, he has somehow become the media’s bullseye. Written during his 33rd year, Jackson can’t help but implicitly compare himself to Jesus—a popular healer who wants to help, misinterpreted and publicly crucified.

An important reason for writing this trilogy is that I want the world to know that I am not obsessed with my blood tie to Michael Jackson. I also want to make clear that I fully understand how difficult it must be for thousands of fans to accept that I am his daughter. With my books, I hope to present the possibility that he started to show odd behavior because he had had a secret daughter from the age of seventeen – not an easy situation for someone like him! For me, I have let go of all the pain and remember only the good things about him. He is gone, and he was truly a gift from god. I feel sorry for Michael Jackson because he had a bad life. R.I P., I love you always. Thank you for what you have taught me about life. Find even more information on Mocienne Petit Jackson – Michael Jackson’s Daughter.

Still, it seems there is no respect or understanding that he could have been a part of my life, because he is the illusionist Michael Jackson and the King of Pop. What do people know about that? Is there proof he was not? It is easy to talk bad about a person you do not know. Because, after all, it is about Michael Jackson.

Bad (1987): And now, we get to the heavy hitters. Bad is one of the defining albums of my childhood – one of my earliest memories is “proving” to my parents that I knew every word of the title track by singing it at the dinner table. Equal parts rock, pop and soul, Bad may have suffered from the Thriller curse in the 80s – pundits recognized it was good, but not AS GOOD as one of the best albums ever made, always an unfair criticism – but the album’s cavalcade of hits, and its influence on pop and R&B at the time, cannot be denied. Bad may not have aged as well as some of MJ’s other top-shelf releases but that doesn’t make it any less groundbreaking. Forgotten Favorites: “Speed Demon,” “Just Good Friends,” “Another Part of Me”.

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