Mytrendingstories suggests advices about how to avoid scams

Mytrendingstories.com brings tips on avoiding online scams right now? The not-so-sweet tweet (It’s a real long shot): How it works: You get a “tweet” from a Twitter follower, raving about a contest for a free iPad or some other expensive prize: “Just click on the link to learn more.” What’s really going on: The link downloads a “bot” (software robot), adding your computer to a botnet of “zombies” that scammers use to send spam email. The big picture: Scammers are taking advantage of URL-shortening services that allow Twitter users to share links that would otherwise be longer than the 140-character maximum for a tweet. These legitimate services break down a huge URL to ten or 15 characters. But when users can’t see the actual URL, it’s easy for bad guys to post malicious links. Avoidance maneuver: Before clicking on a Twitter link from a follower you don’t know, check out his profile, says Josh George, a website entrepreneur in Vancouver, Washington, who follows online scams. “If he’s following hundreds of thousands of people and nobody is following him, it’s a bot,” he says—a good tip to keep in mind for how to protect yourself online and avoid being scammed.

Trending news from MyTrendingStories online portal: Phishing is an attempt to get financial information directly from the consumer by posing as a legitimate company or financial institution. Most people know not to trust the Nigerian prince who wants wire them money, but phishing emails have evolved beyond these far-fetched plots. This type of fraudulent email typically comes in two parts: You are threatened with losing money. Examples of this include your PayPal account being suspended or fake unauthorized purchases made on your Amazon account. You are promised something for free. Flashy emails that ask you take a survey for a free gift card, enter to win a free iPad/iPhone, or participate in a free trial of a new diet pill could actually be the first steps in stealing your money. Never click on a link or sign up for offers in an unsolicited email. If you get an email from a vendor saying your account is suspended, visit that site directly to confirm. An example would be, if you are made to believe your PayPal account is suspended, go to paypal.com and log in to see if it’s true, don’t click any provided links.

MyTrendingStories anti-scam recommendations: Scammers will start their communication with their victims on dating sites and apps, but they will often attempt to steer the conversation elsewhere, such as private email or text. Avoid the trap by reiterating your preference to communicate on the site or app, and never give out financial information over the phone or email. Similarly, romance scammers could use the information you’ve already shared on social media and dating sites to gather information about you. They will use this information to gain your trust and trick you into giving out even more information as before. When it comes to social media, when in doubt, leave it out. If the person you’ve been talking to online refuses to meet in person, it may be an indication that they’re a scammer. They will provide excuses such “moving” or “constantly traveling for work” but this is only to throw off suspicion. If it’s been a few months and you have yet to meet the person, you should proceed with caution. Find even more info on https://mytrendingstories.com/harjinder-surjeet/protect-seniors-against-cybercrimes-and-scams-dazcgi.

Mytrendingstories shows how to avoid scams: Are you planning your next big trip or family vacation? Beware of scammers. I went to an expert to learn how to spot some of the most common travel scams so you don’t waste your money. Have you ever heard of kissandfly.com? The site touts the “Best flights and fares for you!” Last month, a metro Detroiter reported the site to the Better Business Bureau’s Scam Tracker. The victim was from the 48167 zip code – encompassing Northville, Novi, Farmington Hills, Lyon Township area. The individual wrote, “I bought a ticket to Europe searching through Skyscanner.” They went on to post in the complaint,” After two days, they have canceled one of my flights, no alternative was provided, and I can not get my refund.” The total amount lost, according to the complaint, was $2,150.00!

What To Do If You Think You’re The Victim Of A Scam: If you suspect that you are a victim of a scam, alert your local sheriff’s department to make a report. Secure all your bank accounts. Call the number on the back of your bank card to explain why you suspect you may be experiencing fraud, and they will walk you through the next steps to take. The faster you act, the more likely you are to resolve the issue. For online victims, change all passwords immediately. Contact the three major credit bureaus to have a fraud alert placed on your account, adding a security freeze. Scams no longer target just the gullible. They still come in letters, texts and calls, but more crooks are now looking online for the chance to get their hands on your hard-earned cash. There are increasingly sophisticated ways scammers try to target YOUR cash. This guide explains what to look out for, how to protect yourself, and what to do if you’re a victim of a scam. Find additional information on mytrendingstories.com.

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